Shaking the Family Tree

My great, great grandparents,  Peter and Mary Ann Davey with eldest daughter MaryAnne at Creswick, Victoria, C1868.

I shook the Family Tree and down came MaryAnne Goodwin Davey.

When I first came to Tasmania I gave no thought to the fact that I was returning to the state where my great, great grandmother arrived in Australia, as a convict, in 1845 on the “Tory 1”. Catharine Steele nee Platt, was a widow and worked as a laundress to support two little daughters. Times were tough and she stole some shoes and her and her children were deported to Launceston. Sadly, her children died on the voyage, she was reported to have been quarrelsome and discontented, not surprising, given the circumstances.

Catharine married another convict, James Goodwin, on 10/8/1846 at Campbell Town C. of E., James was a potter convicted in1840 of burglary. At the time of their marriage James was 32, a farmer and Catharine was 33, a servant. The census in 1848 shows them living in Launceston where son James was born 1847 but died in 1848. Mary Ann was born in 1849. Then twin boys, William and Joseph were born in 1851, sadly Joseph died in 1852.

In Sept. of 1853 the family left for the Victorian Goldfields on “Queen of the Netherlands”.

Mary Ann 4, William 2, with their parents travelled inland from Port Phillip Bay, a long, tiring journey, probably on foot north of Melbourne to settle in Creswick, where rough huts and tents were home to the gold diggers.

They arrived into a harsh countryside with rough bark huts or tents, as shelters from the extreme cold of winter. Catharine, at 40 years would have few female friends among the diggers – most of the men would leave their wives and children in the towns but the Goodwins had no home or town so they had to establish for themselves with whatever they could find.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

There is no evidence that any gold was found but this pioneer family braved the elements and harsh conditions to be the foundation of the Raisbeck side of the family in Australia. In the early years of the colony there was little medical help available and “survival of the fittest” prevailed.The women were also expected to bake the bread and grow the vegetables. There was no running water or electricity or sewerage syastem so life consisted of hard work just to remain alive.

Mary Ann Goodwin married Pietro Fandony , (PeterDavey) in 1864 when she was 15 years and they had 11 children, including my grandmother, Violet Fandony who was born in 1886 at Creswick, Victoria. 

Violet married Edwin Raisbeck and they were my paternal grandparents.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.